I am completely honored, and more than excited, to be the featured artist of the current Photo London magazine. Previous artists include Sarah Moon, Dennis Hopper and Stephen Shore, all of whom are personal photography heroes.

The magazine includes an interview, a curated selection of works, and a behind the scenes video from a photo shoot with Bananarama. You can view and download the complete issue here.

My sincere thanks to Photo London, for including me in their publication, the Association of Photographers, for the nomination, and Kirsty Mackay for her curatorial eye.

Wendy Carrig is represented by A&R Creative Agency

MANY THANKS TO ANOTHER PRODUCTION FOR THIS INTERVIEW I MADE WITH THEM, IN RESPONSE TO THEIR MENTORSHIP PROGRAMME FOR FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHY GRADUATES

How long have you worked as a photographer, and what is your particular area of expertise?

– I set up my business at the beginning of the nineties so, wow, thirty years, something to celebrate!

– I am known for photographing people, and this crosses over multi genres.

What assumptions (if any) have you had to deal with in your career?

– I began my career working for teen magazines where I received countless commissions (including many international assignments) mainly from female fashion & beauty editors. They had no assumptions and gave me equal opportunity.

– In the past, assumptions were generally made by businesses that had a predominantly male workforce. e.g. Traditional photographic suppliers often made the assumption I was an assistant photographer, purchasing on behalf of a male photographer.

Do you feel in the minority as a female photographer?

– No, but there are still many occasions when someone onset will say “oh, it’s an all female team today,” or “hey, girlpower” or whatever. But I’ve spent most of my career on all female teams, and that seems usual to me. So the fact it seems unusual to others shows that women photographers are still in the minority.

Do you think much has changed for women in the industry since you started?

– When I first started there were very few women working as commercial photographers. Apparently female photographers now make up about 25% of commercial photographers, which is great! However recent research shows that female photographers aren’t being commissioned as often as male photographers. There is a worrying statistic that female photographers only receive 2% of advertising commissions! If this is true, then most advertising is seen through the #malegaze which is a massive problem.

Do you feel you’ve had the opportunity to use your full potential?

Hmm, that’s an interesting question.

– If women photographers aren’t being offered as many commissions as male photographers, then maybe this question should be posed to the commissioners : Do commissioners feel they have given women photographers opportunity to use their full potential? Do commissioners feel they have had opportunity to respond to the consumer using the full potential of the #femalegaze?

Have you had a Mentor? Do you think there is value in mentorship?

– As a photographer’s assistant I had a full-time job for three years with a highly regarded photographer, so I guess everyday I was being mentored. Not just on the technical side of photography, but also the business of photography, the actual practice of being on set, problem solving, managing teams, and understanding light; and once I began producing my own test shots I would look to my ‘mentor’ to critique my photography.

– Recently I have become a mentor to student photographers. It’s something I really enjoy and find hugely rewarding.

How do you feel about the future for female photographers?

– Women generally have to work harder to get noticed in most industries and photography is no exception. If you have learnt your trade, if you are technically competent, have creative ideas, and can problem solve under pressure, then the future is yours.

What’s your dream gig? Have you landed it yet?

– I have had some great and crazy experiences throughout my career. I’ve been sent on assignments from India to Iceland, Bali to Brazil. On my first trip to LA I arrived in the middle of the infamous Rodney King Riots and escaped curfew to photograph Angelina Jolie dancing against the infinite horizons of the Mojave Desert. After a rocky start to a job in Rio, where I’d been let down by local assistants, I went on to photograph the statue of Christ the Redeemer from a helicopter – the pilot gave me an extra harness then removed the cabin door so I could get a better shot! An inspiring career highlight in so many ways.

– So you can’t plan for your dream gig, it just happens. It’s when all the elements come together in a perfect storm and you know in that split second you have something special and you know how to use your camera to capture the story, the emotion. That’s when the magic of photography happens.

Knowing what you know now, what advice would you give yourself if you were just starting out?

– Take time to pause and check on the direction your career is taking you.

– Listen to advice, but know what is worthy of action.

– Critique your work regularly and aim to produce a new folio each year.

– Create an efficient filing system from the word go – know how to easily access any of your images.

– Take care of your archive, your past can also become your future.

Do you have any confidence tips to share with students questioning whether or not they are cut out to pursue a career in the industry?

– I’ve mentioned this before, but you can’t go wrong with this check list – perseverance, preparation, process, productivity, passion. You could also include projects and professionalism.

– Ask yourself, do you want to be a photographer, or do you want to create work using photography? Photography and picture making come first, you can’t call yourself a photographer without doing the work.

– Working for yourself requires dedication, self-discipline, and when starting out you need to be able to support yourself financially. How are you going to make money? Do the maths.

– Do you have strong ideas, do you have stories you want to tell, messages you want to get across? Do you have the passion to create new photography?

– Then take photographs everyday, discover what you like, what you are good at.

– Make it happen!

In light of Covid, what insights or advice could you give for those starting out and looking to establish themselves under these circumstances?

– Get to know as much about the industry as possible.

– Know who you are – photographer or assistant – and pitch yourself correctly and accurately.

– Join a professional organisation like the Association of Photographers (AOP). They have been incredibly supportive to their members throughout the pandemic, and have recently formed f22 – women photographers at the AOP.

– Establish your work and name by entering photography awards, attending online workshops and seminars.

– Establish your online presence. Keep your Instagram account up to date and invest in a decent practical website. LinkedIn is also very good for business networking.

– Connectivity is really important. Don’t be alone.

– Keep taking pictures. Keep thinking, planning and creating.

And building on our belief in women supporting women, are there any female photographers whose work you think we/people should see?

It would be unfair of me to create a list – there are so many excellent female photographers, do check them out at Equal Lens, f22, HundredHeroines and WOMEN PHOTOGRAPH. But I would like to mention Kirsty Mackay and Suki Dhanda. Both these women assisted me back in the nineties, and have since gone on to forge successful careers in their own unique photographic styles. My heartfelt thanks to them, and all the women I have worked with over the years. Mentoring is a two way exchange.

Many thanks to Suzanne McDougall at Another Production for the interview.

Exciting news, my series on ocean plastics has been awarded GOLD by the Association of Photographers.

I created these images, part of a larger series, to highlight the overwhelming quantities of discarded plastics that are polluting and choking our oceans. I hope exposure surrounding the AOP awards will help highlight the issue, and I am pleased to see there is already coverage on the BBC website and in today’s Guardian.

Meanwhile my thanks to Art Buyer & Creative Producer Kathy Howes who judged the Still Life & Object category and chose my series, and Creative Director Geoff Waring for encouraging me to explore my ideas in still life. As photographers we generally and naturally fall into shooting a particular genre. I am known for photographing people and therefore feel a greater achievement to have my work appreciated across genres.

On a final note, apparently I am the first woman to be a two times recipient of an AOP gold, which makes me extra proud.

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 Images first published in Perfect Bound magazine.

Wendy Carrig is represented by A&R Creative Agency London

Photo London opens to the public today, billed as the first International Photography fair online. There are lots of new and exciting works to view and admission is free.

Included are five of my images, selected for this year’s AOP Photography Awards. The Association of Photographers are one of the 100+ exhibitors and are showcasing all the finalists from this years Awards.

My images can also be viewed on the Artsy site :

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019

I found it incredibly moving watching this exhibition. At a time when visiting galleries has been difficult or impossible, the clever people at the British Journal of Photography have created something quite magical.

400 photographs [from the 2019 and 2020 Portrait of Humanity award] ascending 130,000 feet into the stratosphere, broadcasting a message of peace and unity from humankind to space – and possibly even our extra-terrestrial counterparts.”

There is more that unites us than sets us apart

From take-off to landing, enjoy the whole exhibition here.

As always, my thanks to Emma Slade, Madeleine Smith, Julie Read, Betty Brigstock-Williams and the Parker family. Thanks also to the teams at Portrait of Humanity and British Journal of Photography.

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2018

Well this is interesting, one of my photographs is going to be shown in the first ever photography exhibition in Space!

Hosted by the British Journal of Photography, you are invited to a private view at 18.00GMT today, my portrait of Buddhist Monk Emma Slade will be exhibited as part of the BJP’s Portrait of Humanity award.

Here is a taster video.

More info to follow

©2018 copyright Wendy Carrig

“As individual as our personality, it will always be our own unique view of life that sets us apart..”





Massive thanks to the Association of Photographers. A short interview I made with them is published today. You can read the entire piece here

The Space Between is a new photography exhibition showcasing work from
f22 - women photographers at the AOP, and featuring five new pieces by me.
Exploring the physical and emotional space between objects, people and nature,
The Space Between opens today and runs until September 23rd.

All photography copyright Wendy Carrig All Rights Reserved.

This is a career highlight for me. My portrait of Jonathan Morgan, a volunteer lifesaver with the RNLI has been chosen as a winner of the Portrait of Britain award! There were over 13,000 entries to this photography competition, and the 100 winning images will be displayed in a public photography exhibition at the many JCDeceaux screens around the country.

My thanks to judges Simon Bainbridge at the British Journal of Photography, Parveen Narowalia at British Vogue, and Martin Usborne at Hoxton Mini Press, who are also publishing the forthcoming book.

I would also like to thank all the lifesavers and shore crew at RNLI Dungeness for continuing to support my pop-up portrait studio, and more importantly their undaunted work in saving lives at sea.

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2018

I photographed Alex Jones for Stella magazine in June 2020, my first commissioned shoot since the beginning of lockdown.  Working in the #newnormal means temperature checks, face masks, face visors, individual computer screens, social distancing and the constant application of hand gel.  Alex, who has been working throughout lockdown, was completely at ease with all these changes.  A calm, consummate professional, and an absolute pleasure to meet and photograph.  You can read the full feature here
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With thanks to top team :
Krishna Sheth –  Director of Photography for Stella Magazine
Tona Stell– Style Editor at The Telegraph
Gemma Gravett – Digital Operator
Thanks also to the considerate team at Loft Studios
Photography by Wendy Carrig represented by A&R Creative Agency
Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2020 All Rights Reserved

Portrait of me by Gemma Gravett, thank you Gemma x