Posts tagged Photography Exhibition

My portraits of reform campaigner and TED speaker Kate Morrissey, and outsider artist Rachel Ara, are currently on show at Photo London as part of the Someone’s Daughter exhibition.

The exhibition, commissioned by The View magazine, is on show at Photo London until Sunday, and I’m pleased to be exhibiting alongside Nick Knight, Carol Allen Storey, Craig Easton, Laura Pannack, Nadav Kander, Hannah Starkey, Kristina Varaksina, Felicity Crawshaw, Poulomi Bassi, Conor Horgan, Harry Borden, Jennie Baptiste, Alba Duque, Billie Scheepers, Emily Garthwaite, Gavin Smith, Fiona Freund, Sarah Bennet, Amelia Troubridge.

Someone’s Daughter is an important new photography exhibition created by The View Magazine, lead campaigners for the rights of women in the criminal justice system. The View has commissioned twenty five international photographers, each to create new portraits of a woman activist/former prisoner, and a leading woman in the field of law/human rights. It was my pleasure and honour to photograph two extraordinary and inspiring women – campaigner Kate Morrissey and artist Rachel Ara.

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Kate Morrissey and Zane

The final portraits are being kept under wraps until the big reveal when the Someone’s Daughter exhibition opens at Photo London this autumn. The exhibition will then go on tour to venues including the House of Lords, and the National Justice Museum. The portraits will be auctioned, raising funds to help The View Magazine continue their vital work supporting women prisoners and their families, and a copy of each portrait will be donated to the National Portrait Gallery for it’s permanent collection.

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Rachel Ara
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My thanks to The View Magazine, it’s an honour to be included in this important initiative. The exhibition will be curated by renowned photography expert Jennie Ricketts, former picture editor of the Observer magazine, and trustee at Autograph gallery and the Martin Parr Foundation. I’m pleased to be exhibiting alongside photographers Alba Duque, Amelia Troubridge, Billie Scheepers, Carol Allen-Storey, Conor Horgan, Craig Easton, David O’Driscoll, Emily Garthwaite, Felicity Crawshaw, Gavin Smith, Hannah Starkey, Harry Borden, Jennie Baptiste, Kristina Varaksina, Laura Pannack, Nadav Kander, Nick Haddow, Nick Knight, Poulomi Basu, Sara Bennett.

You can see the full exhibition at Photo London from 8th-12th September 2021. Photo London is open to the public and tickets can be purchased here. Further exhibition dates and venues to be announced. If you wish to support The View Magazine you can subscribe or make a donation here.

All photography shown here by Wendy Carrig ©2021 All Rights Reserved

Self-Portrait is the latest group exhibition from f22 photographers, with images selected by guest curator Jaki Jo Hannan, founder of Equal Lens. The exhibition is part of a wider celebration of International Women’s Day and all images can be seen here until 31st March.

This image was originally included in a fashion editorial titled The Searchers published in Perfect Bound magazine, and photographed on the inspiring Lidham Hill Farm estate in Kent, courtesy of Jo at Farm Locations.

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig All Rights Reserved

I love the genuine emotion in this picture of model Kate Groombridge with her sons, Kate showering her boys with love and they feeling safe in her embrace under the wings of her coat. The picture has been selected for HOPE the latest group photography exhibition from the AOP which opens today and can be viewed here. I especially recommend viewing the short film by Catherine Losing, a compelling story of her family’s journey.

Exhibiting photographers have also been asked five questions :

When did you first pick up a camera and what did you point it at? I was ten and photographed my parents on a family day out at the seaside. I wanted to know how it would feel to hold the camera and press the shutter, and perhaps more importantly I had begun to realise the importance of documenting a chosen moment.

What inspires you? My inspirations constantly change. Today they are most definitely family, friends, faces, love, light, scent, touch, emotion, laughter, a secret path, big sky, trees, the sea, changing seasons, setting sun, dawn, the past, the future.

What’s been your favourite location for a shoot? Iceland and Dungeness.

If you had a time machine what advice would you give to your younger self ? Just do it, there is more than you could ever imagine.

Which of the AOP benefits are most valuable to you?  Friendship, especially with the fabulous women of the f22.

This picture is part of a series titled Heartland that I worked on with a wonderful team of creatives who all volunteer their time and creativity to producing personal projects. My thanks to art director Jo Bell, makeup and hair artist Lizzie Court, fashion stylist Maria Francolini, my assistant and forever birthday girl Julie Stewart and the forever young Kate Groombridge and family. The pictures were published in FY magazine and you can view all images from the original story here.

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2021 All Rights Reserved

Actions of Art & Solidarity opened today at the Kunstnernes Hus Oslo. This international group exhibition has been curated by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) and I am absolutely thrilled to be invited as a participating artist, showing an extensive portfolio of my Greenham Common photography.

“…includes works by both national and international artists operating in the name of cultural, socio-political and environmental solidarity across various geographies and contexts…”

I am of course disappointed that I can’t be in Norway for the opening events, but I am hoping that I may get to see the exhibition [and meet the team] at the Kunstnernes Hus before it closes on March 21st. My sincere thanks to Katya Garcia-Anton, director and chief curator at OCA; Elsa Itzel Archundia Esquivel; Liv Brissach; also Astrid Vostermans the contemporary art publisher and founder of Valiz who is publishing the accompanying reader.

Solidarity has re-entered the global zeitgeist with resounding force in the last decade. It has driven new thinking focused on countering systemic failures and outright abuses related to climate, economy, surveillance, health, gender and race amongst other issues. Actions of Art and Solidarity considers the central role that artists play within this historical shift in the new millenium, drawing parallels to synergic cases of the twentiethcentury.

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig. All rights reserved

Beatriz Gonzales, Mural para fabrica socialista (detail( 1981)

Six of my images have been chosen for this ‘people’s choice’ exhibition – many, many thanks to everyone who liked and left comments. All 58 images created by 28 photographers can be viewed here from today until 21st January.

Many thanks again to the original team that worked on the series : Jo Bell art director, Maria Francolini stylist, Lizzie Court hair & makeup, Sam Turpin at Production Inc, the amazing Julie Stewart; the team at FY magazine, and of course the most generous and delightful model, photographer, dog-hotelier and host, Liddie Holt (and friends) x

Wishing you all a very happy and safe New Year.

Exhibition curation by Rachel Rogers at the Association of Photographers. Photography copyright Wendy Carrig All Rights Reserved

I found it incredibly moving watching this exhibition. At a time when visiting galleries has been difficult or impossible, the clever people at the British Journal of Photography have created something quite magical.

400 photographs [from the 2019 and 2020 Portrait of Humanity award] ascending 130,000 feet into the stratosphere, broadcasting a message of peace and unity from humankind to space – and possibly even our extra-terrestrial counterparts.”

There is more that unites us than sets us apart

From take-off to landing, enjoy the whole exhibition here.

As always, my thanks to Emma Slade, Madeleine Smith, Julie Read, Betty Brigstock-Williams and the Parker family. Thanks also to the teams at Portrait of Humanity and British Journal of Photography.

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2018

Well this is interesting, one of my photographs is going to be shown in the first ever photography exhibition in Space!

Hosted by the British Journal of Photography, you are invited to a private view at 18.00GMT today, my portrait of Buddhist Monk Emma Slade will be exhibited as part of the BJP’s Portrait of Humanity award.

Here is a taster video.

More info to follow

©2018 copyright Wendy Carrig

“As individual as our personality, it will always be our own unique view of life that sets us apart..”





Massive thanks to the Association of Photographers. A short interview I made with them is published today. You can read the entire piece here

The Space Between is a new photography exhibition showcasing work from
f22 - women photographers at the AOP, and featuring five new pieces by me.
Exploring the physical and emotional space between objects, people and nature,
The Space Between opens today and runs until September 23rd.

All photography copyright Wendy Carrig All Rights Reserved.

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***UPDATE - EXHIBITION EXTENDED UNTIL THE END OF JULY 2019**

Representatiion on the Line: (Un)framing our Identities
You are invited to the launch party and private view of this collaborative
exhibition from the RPS Hundred Heroines initiative, in which female
photographers explore the theme of identity.
I will be exhibiting a series of portraits illustrating modern gender
performance and the new gender-fluid approach to beauty without boundaries, 
originally commissioned for Perfect Bound magazine.
I hope to see you there!
WWW.WENDYCARRIG.CO.UK

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Many thanks to Feng Gu at The China Photography Association for
featuring my work in their magazine.
Here is a translation of the interview :

1 Could you tell me your experiences in photography?

I studied photography at Salisbury College of Art before moving to
London to work for four years as an apprentice, mainly to the music
and portrait photographer Mike Owen; he introduced me to the legendary 
surrealist photographer Angus McBean whom I also had the pleasure of
working with.
I set up on my own in 1990.


2  Introduce your job of commercial photography? Do you take documentary
photography now? How do you deal with the relationship of commercial
photography and documentary photography?

Most of my commercial work comes via A&R Creative Agency – a wonderful
team who have represented me for 25 years. I am regularly commissioned
for fashion, beauty, lifestyle and portraiture assignments - recent clients
include NBC/The Bi-Life, Triumph, Elle Germany and Stella Telegraph magazine.
I am also known for my portrait photography. My work has been selected for
both catalogue cover and poster campaign for the Taylor Wessing Photographic
Portrait Prize at The National Portrait Gallery London; and I have won the
AOP best in category award for portraiture at the Association of Photographer’s
Awards. Recent sittings include the Olympian athlete Tessa Sanderson CBE,
the MP Dr.Rosena Allin-Khan, Buddhist nun Emma Slade, the girl band
Bananarama, and Ayda Field Williams.
I am considering working on a new documentary project, but nothing has
been decided upon yet.


3  What is the Greenham Common Peace Camp? Could you introduce it to
our Chinese readers? 

Greenham Common is a former British RAF (Royal Air Force) base. During
the Cold War period in the 1980s the British government allowed American
nuclear missiles to be installed there. Many people were outraged at
this act and a group of women demonstrators made a peaceful protest by
walking 100 miles from Wales to Greenham Common. The number of protestors
eventually grew into thousands and Peace Camps were set up encircling
the base and became women-only.  Their mission, to peacefully disrupt
the movement and deployment of nuclear missiles.


4 Did you join it? Tell some stories about it and you?

I was a photography student during the mid-1980s and visited the
Peace Camp for my final year project. I stayed at Greenham for a
couple of weeks during a very cold winter - sleeping under tarpaulin,
eating donated food and wearing donated clothes. Every morning police
and bailiffs would evict us from the site, and as soon as they had
left we would return to relight the campfire for warmth, tea, talk
and songs;  and some women would plot and plan and eventually by
nightfall would cut through the wire fence that surrounded the base,
and often be arrested found sitting alongside a nuclear missile.


5 When you shot these photos of COMMON PEOPLE did you you think there
will be an exhibition of your work 30 years later?

No, not at all, the pictures have been stored in my negative files
until only last year. 


6  What do you want to convey through these photos?

My pictures mainly show quiet, domestic life at the Peace Camp. I realise
now that this vision is possibly unique, as by excluding all men from
the camps would have also meant excluding most photographers, as photography
at that time was very much male dominated.


7  How do you think the photography experiences affected your later
photography career?

As a student I was interested in both documentary and fashion photography.
As a professional photographer I fell into working in the fashion industry
as I was inspired by the photographers, mainly fashion photographers, whom
I had assisted. In recent years I have been working towards more portrait
commissions as I like to show a reality and truth in my work. Re-visiting
my Greenham pictures has made me reconsider my early thoughts on documentary
photography and I am now looking for new ways I can take this forward in my
career.


8 What do you think about as a woman photographer in shooting beauty,
fashion,lifestyle photography?

I believe that whatever genre of photography I choose to work in – beauty,
fashion, lifestyle, portraiture, documentary etc - my creative style
as a photographer is as individual and unique as the personality of
any photographer, regardless of gender.


9  How many years do you take photography as a career? And How do you
keep your passion alive in photography?

Next year I will be celebrating thirty years as a professional photographer. 
The advent of digital cameras was definitely a moment that boosted my
passion for photography – I often prefer to work with daylight, so the
extra film and shutter speeds combined with auto-focusing allowed me
to push the boundaries of my vision.


10 Could you give some advice to our readers about how to take a nice
photo?

A ‘nice’ photograph doesn’t have to be technically perfect, but I think
it does have to convey something of a message to it’s audience. There is
usually a reason for taking a photograph so it is important that your
audience understands the message or story you are trying to convey.
Photography like art is only ‘nice’ if the viewer believes it to be so. 
I always question my own work by asking myself  “Is it real..?”
“do I believe..?”.

COMMON PEOPLE can be seen at the Greenham Common Control Tower
until this Saturday 9th March.

 

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My COMMON PEOPLE exhibition featured on the BBC news website today

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-46468386

Exhibition runs until 9th March 2019 at the Greenham Common Control Tower

COMMON PEOPLE photography exhibition poster

I am pleased to announce that my COMMON PEOPLE photography exhibition will be opening at the Greenham Common Control Tower on Sunday 9th December 2018 and will run for three months until 9th March 2019. All the photography on show was taken at Greenham Common Peace Camp during the mid-1980s whilst I was a photography student at Salisbury College of Art. Many thanks to Meg Thomas and the trustees of The Tower for inviting me to exhibit my work in their new gallery space. All photography is for sale, together with an exhibition poster and postcards. If you would like to attend the launch event, especially if you were at the Peace Camp during the 1980s, please DM me via the contact form on my website. Best wishes. Wendy