Posts tagged documentary photography

A new exhibition of my COMMON PEOPLE photography (including previously unseen images) opens at The Base this autumn. I am delighted to be showing my work alongside Jemima Brown‘s Peace Camp, and David Hockney‘s Hockney & Hollywood.

In 1981 a group of 36 women walked from Cardiff, Wales, to Newbury, Berkshire. It took them ten days to walk the 110 miles, some pushing children in pushchairs, sleeping in tents and church halls on the way. Their peaceful protest was against the siting of American nuclear missiles on British common land. On arrival they set up camp outside RAF Greenham Common. This was the beginning of the legendary Greenham Women’s Peace Camp.

Despite this being the largest female-led protest since suffrage, this extraordinary event has largely been written out of history. So to mark it’s 40th anniversary, and to get people talking again about the achievements of these remarkable women, the group Greenham Women Everywhere (GWE) are re-creating the march; following as close as possible to the original route and staying overnight in the same areas.

I photographed the Greenham Women’s Peace Camp in 1985 when I was a photography student, and now GWE have invited me to join them on their new march. I will be documenting the walkers, the rallies, the camping, the singing and the many cups of tea. From when the march leaves Cardiff, and throughout the following ten days until arrival at Greenham Common.

It will be a huge honor to be part of this pilgrimage. I hope that my photography will help highlight the importance of peaceful protest, and the remarkable achievements made by the original Greenham Women.

For more information about Greenham Women Everywhere and details of the march please click here

If you would like to buy me or my assistant a cup of tea to fuel us on our journey I have set up an account with ko-fi here.

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor to help me bring this project to fruition, I would love to hear from you. The easiest way is to DM me through my Instagram channel, or message me through my website www.wendycarrig.co.uk

Many thanks as always for your support and for reading my blog.

Wendy x

What Greenham Women Everywhere say :

“The timing couldn’t be more crucial as we face the multiple, cascading crises of the climate emergency, nuclear weapons escalation, daily violence against women, extreme hunger, social inequality – and so much more. We need to stand on the shoulders of our foremothers and carry their campaigns for peace and justice forward, while securing the Greenham Women’s unique place in activist history.”

Someone’s Daughter is an important new photography exhibition created by The View Magazine, lead campaigners for the rights of women in the criminal justice system. The View has commissioned twenty five international photographers, each to create new portraits of a woman activist/former prisoner, and a leading woman in the field of law/human rights. It was my pleasure and honour to photograph two extraordinary and inspiring women – campaigner Kate Morrissey and artist Rachel Ara.

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Kate Morrissey and Zane

The final portraits are being kept under wraps until the big reveal when the Someone’s Daughter exhibition opens at Photo London this autumn. The exhibition will then go on tour to venues including the House of Lords, and the National Justice Museum. The portraits will be auctioned, raising funds to help The View Magazine continue their vital work supporting women prisoners and their families, and a copy of each portrait will be donated to the National Portrait Gallery for it’s permanent collection.

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Rachel Ara
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My thanks to The View Magazine, it’s an honour to be included in this important initiative. The exhibition will be curated by renowned photography expert Jennie Ricketts, former picture editor of the Observer magazine, and trustee at Autograph gallery and the Martin Parr Foundation. I’m pleased to be exhibiting alongside photographers Alba Duque, Amelia Troubridge, Billie Scheepers, Carol Allen-Storey, Conor Horgan, Craig Easton, David O’Driscoll, Emily Garthwaite, Felicity Crawshaw, Gavin Smith, Hannah Starkey, Harry Borden, Jennie Baptiste, Kristina Varaksina, Laura Pannack, Nadav Kander, Nick Haddow, Nick Knight, Poulomi Basu, Sara Bennett.

You can see the full exhibition at Photo London from 8th-12th September 2021. Photo London is open to the public and tickets can be purchased here. Further exhibition dates and venues to be announced. If you wish to support The View Magazine you can subscribe or make a donation here.

All photography shown here by Wendy Carrig ©2021 All Rights Reserved

Women Photograph aims to reshape the makeup of the photojournalism community, ensuring “…the industry’s chief storytellers are as diverse as the communities they hope to represent.”

Established in 2017 Women Photograph is a non-profit created to elevate the voices of women & non-binary photographers. My thanks to Women Photograph founder Daniella Zalcman for inviting me to join and support this important group of 1000 female photojournalists, representing 100 countries.

Every day the Women Photograph team records the lead photo bylines from the front pages of eight major international newspapers, including The New York Times, Le Monde and The Guardian. Here are the stats from the most recent quarter:

To see more photography by Wendy Carrig please click here.

The JMC awards have taken their name from pioneering photographer Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879) who is recognised as one of the foremost photographers of the 19th Century.

I’m delighted to have my work selected for the 16th JMC awards, especially in genres I am not usually known for. The work is all from my personal projects : Don’t Look Now, ALL at SEA and On This Line That Divides.

Many thanks to judges Elisabeth Biondi, Barbara Davidson and the good people at the Worldwide Photography Gala Awards. An exhibition showing all of the finalists will be held at the Fotonostrum Gallery Barcelona in November 2021.

All photography copyright Wendy Carrig. All rights Reserved

**Exhibition extended until 21st March 2021**

I am delighted to be exhibiting a portfolio of my Greenham Common photography at The Pie Factory Margate as part of POW Festival 2021

POW! is a charity celebrating and exploring issues around feminism, women and girls, and their annual festival is designed to coincide with International Women’s Day celebrations.

To accompany the opening of Actions of Art and Solidarity at the Kunstnernes Hus Norway this week, the curatorial team at the Office for Contemporary Art, Norway invited participating artists to contribute suggestions for a protest playlist:

Get Up, Stand Up – Bob Marley and the Wailers, Respect – Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye – What’s Going On, Ku Klux Klan & Handsworth Revolution – Steel Pulse, and Beyonce – Run the World (Girls). Listen to these and more here.

Actions of Art & Solidarity opened today at the Kunstnernes Hus Oslo. This international group exhibition has been curated by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) and I am absolutely thrilled to be invited as a participating artist, showing an extensive portfolio of my Greenham Common photography.

“…includes works by both national and international artists operating in the name of cultural, socio-political and environmental solidarity across various geographies and contexts…”

I am of course disappointed that I can’t be in Norway for the opening events, but I am hoping that I may get to see the exhibition [and meet the team] at the Kunstnernes Hus before it closes on March 21st. My sincere thanks to Katya Garcia-Anton, director and chief curator at OCA; Elsa Itzel Archundia Esquivel; Liv Brissach; also Astrid Vostermans the contemporary art publisher and founder of Valiz who is publishing the accompanying reader.

Solidarity has re-entered the global zeitgeist with resounding force in the last decade. It has driven new thinking focused on countering systemic failures and outright abuses related to climate, economy, surveillance, health, gender and race amongst other issues. Actions of Art and Solidarity considers the central role that artists play within this historical shift in the new millenium, drawing parallels to synergic cases of the twentiethcentury.

Photography copyright Wendy Carrig. All rights reserved

Beatriz Gonzales, Mural para fabrica socialista (detail( 1981)

Thank you for all your support and kindness throughout this extraordinary year of 2020. Wishing you and your loved ones a safe and happy Christmas.

Wendy x

The good people at adam&eveDDB have created an online Art Auction to raise funds for The Avenues Youth Project a North London Youth Club offering fun out-of-school activities for young people. The auction brief asked for work which focuses on championing diversity and the stories of people of colour.

Click here to view [and bid on] exciting photography and art by a diverse group of creatives – look out for my personal favourite, Stay at Home by collage artist Anna Bu Kliewer – and help raise funds for a great group of kids at The Avenues.

Auction ends 9pm this Sunday 13th December.

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I began my lockdown walks by taking a closer look at my neighbourhood, creating collections of images under the series title The Road To Wellville.
I curated this particular collection around the colour red, but realise it appears to show elements of a crime scene, with undertones of the movies Blow Up and Don’t Look Now.
In hindsight I believe I have subconsciously responded to a real crime I witnessed early in lockdown, the memory of which I tried to suppress.
Researchers from Counting Dead Women project reported to MPs that in the first three weeks of lockdown 14 women and two children had been killed.
Your Sanctuary is one of the charities working to help people suffering from domestic violence.

 

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All photography copyright Wendy Carrig © 2020 All rights Reserved

 

My sister has lived in the Puglia region of Italy for most of her adult life.  This week, as the Italian government eases it’s lockdown restrictions, she can leave her home for the first time in two months.  It’s also her birthday,  so I thought it would be nice to show some photography from her adoptive home.  Happy birthday Lynn Carrig x Ciao bella x

 

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All Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©1988

Last Easter I began creating a series of photography projects on the Dymchurch Sea Wall – documenting the beach it fronts, the low-lying land it protects, and how both locals and visitors use and respond to the wall.  This Easter, with so much having changed in the world, it feels timely to start sharing some of this work.  Here are a few selects from  Bank Holiday.Photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights ReservedPhotography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019 All Rights Reserved
#stayhomethisEaster #ProtecttheNHS #SaveLives
All photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2019  All Rights Reserved

THIS EVENT HAS NOW BEEN POSTPONED

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A unique event discussing law and protest by leading protest practitioners
and hosted by Doughty Street Chambers London.
This event aims to leave you inspired by protest, by providing an overview
of the state of protest law, and mapping the changing nature of policing
protest from Greenham Common to Extinction Rebellion.
The event is combined with my COMMON PEOPLE photography exhibition
which is currently on show in the Doughty Street Chambers private gallery
and will form a visual backdrop to the evening.

If you would like to attend the talk on Thursday 26th March, please message
me here.


COMMON PEOPLE

My COMMON PEOPLE photography exhibition is currently installed at Doughty Street Chambers,London,
home to renowned international human rights and civil liberties
barristers, including Beccy Trowler QC pictured here. I photographed Beccy,
and other women peace protestors at Greenham Common, during the mid eighties
in the midst of a particularly harsh winter - all as part of my photography degree whilst studying at Salisbury College of Art.

Please message me if you would like to attend the private viewing event.

I was extremely honoured to be invited to judge this year's Shot Up North
Awards, and also pleased to discover that I am the first woman photographer
to be sole curator.  For me photography is about passion, emotion, telling
a story, conveying a message, and encouraging reaction.  In selecting the winning
images I chose them not just for their technical excellence, which is a given,
but because of my positive knee-jerk reaction on first viewing them, 
and the continued enjoyment and empathy they evoke upon successive viewings.
They will stand the test of time.
My sincere congratulations to Tom Keen, Sean Knott and Simon Leach on 
Their winning entries, and to everyone who entered the #SUN31 photography awards.
It was my great pleasure to judge such inspiring and emotive photography.
You can see the final 50 images here


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1st place Tom Keen
SUN31_2

2nd place - Sean Knott

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3rd place - Simon Leach

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Many thanks to Feng Gu at The China Photography Association for
featuring my work in their magazine.
Here is a translation of the interview :

1 Could you tell me your experiences in photography?

I studied photography at Salisbury College of Art before moving to
London to work for four years as an apprentice, mainly to the music
and portrait photographer Mike Owen; he introduced me to the legendary 
surrealist photographer Angus McBean whom I also had the pleasure of
working with.
I set up on my own in 1990.


2  Introduce your job of commercial photography? Do you take documentary
photography now? How do you deal with the relationship of commercial
photography and documentary photography?

Most of my commercial work comes via A&R Creative Agency – a wonderful
team who have represented me for 25 years. I am regularly commissioned
for fashion, beauty, lifestyle and portraiture assignments - recent clients
include NBC/The Bi-Life, Triumph, Elle Germany and Stella Telegraph magazine.
I am also known for my portrait photography. My work has been selected for
both catalogue cover and poster campaign for the Taylor Wessing Photographic
Portrait Prize at The National Portrait Gallery London; and I have won the
AOP best in category award for portraiture at the Association of Photographer’s
Awards. Recent sittings include the Olympian athlete Tessa Sanderson CBE,
the MP Dr.Rosena Allin-Khan, Buddhist nun Emma Slade, the girl band
Bananarama, and Ayda Field Williams.
I am considering working on a new documentary project, but nothing has
been decided upon yet.


3  What is the Greenham Common Peace Camp? Could you introduce it to
our Chinese readers? 

Greenham Common is a former British RAF (Royal Air Force) base. During
the Cold War period in the 1980s the British government allowed American
nuclear missiles to be installed there. Many people were outraged at
this act and a group of women demonstrators made a peaceful protest by
walking 100 miles from Wales to Greenham Common. The number of protestors
eventually grew into thousands and Peace Camps were set up encircling
the base and became women-only.  Their mission, to peacefully disrupt
the movement and deployment of nuclear missiles.


4 Did you join it? Tell some stories about it and you?

I was a photography student during the mid-1980s and visited the
Peace Camp for my final year project. I stayed at Greenham for a
couple of weeks during a very cold winter - sleeping under tarpaulin,
eating donated food and wearing donated clothes. Every morning police
and bailiffs would evict us from the site, and as soon as they had
left we would return to relight the campfire for warmth, tea, talk
and songs;  and some women would plot and plan and eventually by
nightfall would cut through the wire fence that surrounded the base,
and often be arrested found sitting alongside a nuclear missile.


5 When you shot these photos of COMMON PEOPLE did you you think there
will be an exhibition of your work 30 years later?

No, not at all, the pictures have been stored in my negative files
until only last year. 


6  What do you want to convey through these photos?

My pictures mainly show quiet, domestic life at the Peace Camp. I realise
now that this vision is possibly unique, as by excluding all men from
the camps would have also meant excluding most photographers, as photography
at that time was very much male dominated.


7  How do you think the photography experiences affected your later
photography career?

As a student I was interested in both documentary and fashion photography.
As a professional photographer I fell into working in the fashion industry
as I was inspired by the photographers, mainly fashion photographers, whom
I had assisted. In recent years I have been working towards more portrait
commissions as I like to show a reality and truth in my work. Re-visiting
my Greenham pictures has made me reconsider my early thoughts on documentary
photography and I am now looking for new ways I can take this forward in my
career.


8 What do you think about as a woman photographer in shooting beauty,
fashion,lifestyle photography?

I believe that whatever genre of photography I choose to work in – beauty,
fashion, lifestyle, portraiture, documentary etc - my creative style
as a photographer is as individual and unique as the personality of
any photographer, regardless of gender.


9  How many years do you take photography as a career? And How do you
keep your passion alive in photography?

Next year I will be celebrating thirty years as a professional photographer. 
The advent of digital cameras was definitely a moment that boosted my
passion for photography – I often prefer to work with daylight, so the
extra film and shutter speeds combined with auto-focusing allowed me
to push the boundaries of my vision.


10 Could you give some advice to our readers about how to take a nice
photo?

A ‘nice’ photograph doesn’t have to be technically perfect, but I think
it does have to convey something of a message to it’s audience. There is
usually a reason for taking a photograph so it is important that your
audience understands the message or story you are trying to convey.
Photography like art is only ‘nice’ if the viewer believes it to be so. 
I always question my own work by asking myself  “Is it real..?”
“do I believe..?”.

COMMON PEOPLE can be seen at the Greenham Common Control Tower
until this Saturday 9th March.

 

"An uncommon angle" Newbury Weekly News

Many thanks to Lin Wilkinson for this wonderful review featured in
The Newbury Weekly News 3rd January 2019 edition.
My COMMON PEOPLE photography exhibition continues at the Greenham Common
Control Tower Berkshire until 9th March - open Thursdays to Sundays.

For more photography by Wendy Carrig please visit WWW.WENDYCARRIG.CO.UK

"It happened at the Boot Fair" an ongoing photography project,
in search of Elvis...

ELVIS PRESLEY

ELVIS PRESLEY

ELVIS PRESLEY

ELVIS PRESLEY

ELVIS PRESLEY

ELVIS PRESLEY

ELVIS PRESLEY

ELVIS PRESLEY

ELVIS PRESLEY

All photography copyright Wendy Carrig ©2018 All Rights Reserved

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My COMMON PEOPLE exhibition featured on the BBC news website today

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-46468386

Exhibition runs until 9th March 2019 at the Greenham Common Control Tower